Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Comic Book, Pop Art Poster


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to show you how to design and create your own, cartoon, pop art poster from scratch. The first step is to create a new document. Go to File and New. You can make it any size,
but for this example, make the Width: 1500 pixels, the Height: 870 pixels and the Resolution:
150 pixels per inch. Make sure the Color Mode is RGB at 8 bits per channel. Then, click OK. Click the foreground color to open the Color Picker. In the hexadecimal field, type
in 16B7F9. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. Your foreground color is now the color
we typed in. To fill your background with this color, press Alt+ Delete on Windows or
Option + Delete on a Mac. Zoom out of your document by pressing Ctrl or Cmd and the minus
key on your keyboard a couple of times. Click the New Layer icon to make a new layer. Open your Custom Shape Tool and open your Shape thumbnails. Click the gear icon to open your
list of custom shape presets. Click “Symbols” and click OK to replace the current shapes
with the shapes from “Symbols”. Click this icon, which is called, “Registration Target
2”. Click the gear icon and tick “Defined Proportions” and check “From Center”.
Click the Shape mode. If you’re using a Photoshop version earlier than CS6, the Shape mode is
here. Make sure the Stroke has no color. Its symbol has the red, diagonal line across it.
Click the Fill’s color box and the Color Picker icon. Type in 44C4F9. Then, click OK or press
Enter or Return. Click on the center of your document and drag out the shape outside the
edges of your document. To hide the paths, press Ctrl or Cmd + H. To fit it back on your
canvas, press Ctrl or Cmd + 0. For now, don’t be concerned if the pattern isn’t exactly
centered on your document. We’ll take care of it later. Click the New Layer icon to make
a new layer. Open your Polygon Tool and click the Fill’s color box. Click the Color Picker
icon, pick white and click OK. Click on your document to open the “Create Polygon” window.
Type in the Width and the Height of your document, which in this example is 1500 by 870 pixels.
For the number of sides, type in 20, check “Star”, indent the sides by 60% and check
“Smooth Indents”. Then, click OK. The shape will be off to the side, but don’t be concerned. After we create all
the shapes, we’ll center them all at the same time. Reduce its Opacity to 25%. We’re going
to make this shape bigger. To do this, open your Transform Tool by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + T. At the top of your screen, click the chain-link icon. This locks the Width and
the Height together. Type in 125% in either field. Notice, the Width and the Height have
the same percentage. Press Enter or Return or click the checkmark at the top. Click the New Layer icon to make a new layer. Click the Fill color box and the Color Picker icon.
For this shape, type in ED0909. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. Click on your
document, type in the Width and the Height and for this shape, indent the sides by 70%. Then, click OK. Make a new layer, click the FIll color box, the Color Picker icon and this time, pick black. Click on your document, type in the Width and Height and for this shape, indent the sides by 90%. We’ll make one more shape. Make a new layer, open the color picker and this time, pick white again. Type in the Width and Height and indent the sides by 99%. We’re ready to center all the shapes on the document. With the top layer active, Shift -click on
Shape 1 to highlight all the layers between it and the top layer. Click your Move Tool and press Ctrl or Cmd + A to select them all. Click the “Align Horizontal Centers” icon and the “Align Vertical Centers” icon. To deselect it, press Ctrl or Cmd + D. Group all the shapes into a folder by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + G. Let’s name it “Shapes”. We’re ready to add text. Open your “Horizontal Type Tool” and choose a font. I’m using “DeathRattle
BB Regular” which I downloaded from www. dafont.com. For your convenience, I provided
its link in the video description of project files. I’ll start with a size of 200 points,
Sharp, and Center Text. Click the color box and type in FFD800. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. Click on your document and type your text. I’ll type my first character
and press the Space bar to make a space between it and the third letter in the word. The reason
is because the second letter of the word is going to be placed in this empty space. It’ll
be bigger than the other characters and will be treated separately. Double-click on an
empty space of the text layer to open its Layer Style window. Click “Stroke”. I’ll make
the Size: 18 pixels, however, depending on the size and resolution of your document,
you may want to adjust this amount. Make sure the Position is “Outside. Then, click OK. Make a copy of your text by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + J. Make the original text layer active
and double-click it to highlight the text. I’ll type the letter “A”, which replaces the
original characters in this layer. To make your character larger, you can either slide
the Text icon to the right or type in a larger point size. To reposition it, open your Move
Tool and move it. The letters are too cramped, so I’ll make the other text layer active,
click between the characters and press and hold Alt or Option as I press the right arrow
key on my keyboard. To reposition and angle your text, Shift-click on your lower text
to highlight both text layers and press Ctrl or Cmd + T to open your Transform Tool. Go
to a corner and when you see a curved, double-arrow, rotate the Transform to an angle you like.
To reposition it, go inside the Transform and move your text. If you want to adjust
its overall size, go to a corner and when you see a diagonal, double-arrow, press and
hold Alt or Option + Shift as you drag it out or in. Then, press Enter or Return. Click the top text layer to make it active and go to Filter, Pixelate and Color Halftone. Click “Rasterize” and keep the default settings. To apply this filter for your remaining character,
make its layer active and press Ctrl or Cmd + F to repeat the last filter. The last step
is to give the text a drop shadow. Shift-click on the top layer to highlight both text layers and click the icon on the upper, right of the Layers panel. Click “Convert to Smart
Object”. This allows us to add more filters and layer styles to the text. I’ll show you
what I mean in a minute. Double-click on an empty area of the Smart Object to open the
Layer Style window. Click “Drop Shadow”. Make the Opacity: 20%, the Distance: 30 pixels
and the Size: 0. Then, click OK. Notice the the drop shadow is the same thickness as your stroked text. If we didn’t convert the text into a smart object, the drop shadow would
be a lot thinner because it would only be applied to the original text without its stroke. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for for watching!

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *